Depression No ratings yet.

Abel Prasad Blog

So let’s talk about depression a somewhat taboo conversation.

Its true I have suffered depression and I never really spoke about it. The purpose of this blog is for people to understand who I am and what I have done to help myself get back on the right path.

Here are some facts about depression that needs to be shared.

  1. 3 million Australians are living with depression or anxiety

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  2. On average, around 1 in 6 women and 1 in 8 men will experience some level of depression.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  3. Nearly three million Australians live with depression and/or anxiety, which affect their wellbeing, personal relationships, career and productivity.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  4. Only 35 per cent of Australians with anxiety and depression access treatment.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  5. Men are less likely to seek help than women, with only 1 in 4 men who experience anxiety or depression accessing treatment.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  6. Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. In Australia, it’s estimated that 45 per cent of people will experience a mental health condition in their lifetime.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  7. In any one year, around 1 million Australian adults have depression, and over 2 million have anxiety.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  8. On average, 1 in 6 people – 1 in 5 women and 1 in 8 men – will experience depression at some stage of their lives.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  9. Research suggests that over 40 per cent of Australians with a mental health condition have a chronic physical illness, and that having a chronic physical illness puts a person at greater risk of developing depression

    Jacka, F.N., Pasco, J.A., Henry, M.J., Korn, S., Williams, L.J., Motowicz, M.A., Nicholson, G.C., Berk, M. (2007). Depression and bone mineral density in a community sample of men: Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Journal of Men’s Health and Gender. Vol. 4 (3), pp.292-297.

  10. Research shows job or financial loss can increase a person’s risk of health problems, such as depression and anxiety.

    Price, R.H., Choi, J.N. and Vinokur, A.D. (2002). Links in the chain of adversity following job loss: How financial strain and loss of personal control lead to depression, impaired functioning, and poor health. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7(4), 302-312.

  11. Over 500,000 Australians will experience depression and a substance use disorder at the same time, at some point in their lives.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

  12. Three million Australians are currently experiencing anxiety or depression.

    Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2008). National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results, 2007. Cat. no. (4326.0). Canberra: ABS.

While we don’t know exactly what causes depression, a number of things are often linked to its development. Depression usually results from a combination of recent events and other longer-term or personal factors, rather than one immediate issue or event.

Research suggests that continuing difficulties – long-term unemployment, living in an abusive or uncaring relationship, long-term isolation or loneliness, prolonged work stress – are more likely to cause depression than recent life stresses. However, recent events (such as losing your job) or a combination of events can ‘trigger’ depression if you’re already at risk because of previous bad experiences or personal factors.

Although there’s been a lot of research in this complex area, there’s still much we don’t know. Depression is not simply the result of a ‘chemical imbalance’, for example because you have too much or not enough of a particular brain chemical. It’s complicated, and there are multiple causes of major depression. Factors such as genetic vulnerability, severe life stressors, substances you may take (some medications, drugs and alcohol) and medical conditions can affect the way your brain regulates your moods.

Most modern antidepressants have an effect on your brain’s chemical transmitters (serotonin and noradrenaline), which relay messages between brain cells – this is thought to be how medications work for more severe depression. Psychological treatment can also help you to regulate your moods.

Effective treatment can stimulate the growth of new nerve cells in circuits that regulate your mood, which is thought to play a critical part in recovering from the most severe episodes of depression.

Everyone’s different and it’s often a combination of factors that can contribute to developing depression. It’s important to remember that you can’t always identify the cause of depression or change difficult circumstances. The most important thing is to recognise the signs and symptoms and seek support.

Find out more about depression and anxiety, available treatments and where to get help in your local area.

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